Features Maintenance LadyMoto Mechanics Guide: Changing Your Oil and Oil Filter

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LadyMoto Mechanics Guide: Changing Your Oil and Oil Filter Hot

yhst-60933755317041_2123_26701112Every spring I would bring my motorcycle in for a spring tune-up with the sneaking suspicion I could easily perform most of the tasks myself. Changing your own oil is a pretty fool proof maintenance task that can save you a few bucks and give you a little bragging rights at the upcoming bike week.

Before you start, take a look at your bike to figure out what tools you need.  If you’re on a full fairing sportbike sometimes you will need a allen wrench to remove your fairings, you can normally find a appropriate wrench in your bike’s tool kit. Remove your fairings bolts and gently pop them off your bike.

Next locate where you pour oil into your bike and where your drain and oil pan are. Check your manual and pick up a few bottles of recommended engine oil and a oil filter. Another purchase I recommend that you can find in most motorcycle stores is a oil drain with a lid, this will allow you to transport and properly dispose of your old oil. Also grab a funnel and a crush washer to replace the used one you will take off your oil plug screw.

Now that you’re armed, head back to the garage, in some old clothes and change some oil! First remove the oil filler cap then drain the oil by setting your oil drain pan under the bike and removing the drain plug in your oil pan. You will get your hands dirty, but that’s all part of it, change your crush washer at this time. Next find your oil filter and remove it, there are special tools for this sometimes, but normally with a  little ingenuity you can remove it with some elbow grease. Throw in the new fliter and make sure it’s TIGHT (don’t use tools for this).  Put your drain plug back in the oil pan and make sure the crush washer is crushed so you don’t leak.

Now it’s time for sparkling, clean new oil; use the filter and after reading your manual, fill your bike with the appropriate amount of oil. Check your oil level and hit the road!

Every spring I would bring my motorcycle in for a spring tune-up with the sneaking suspicion I could easily perform most of the tasks myself. Changing your own oil is a pretty fool proof maintenance task that can save you a few bucks and give you a little bragging rights at the upcoming bike week. Before you start, take a look at your bike to figure out what tools you need. If you’re on a full fairing sportbike sometimes you will need a allen wrench to remove your fairings, you can normally find a appropriate wrench in your bike’s tool kit. Remove your fairings bolts and gently pop them off your bike.

Next locate where you pour oil into your bike and where your drain and oil pan are. Check your manual and pick up a few bottles of recommended engine oil and a oil filter. Another purchase I recommend that you can find in most motorcycle stores is a oil drain with a lid, this will allow you to transport and properly dispose of your old oil. Also grab a funnel and a crush washer to replace the used one you will take off your oil plug screw.

Now that you’re armed, head back to the garage, in some old clothes and change some oil! First remove the oil filler cap then drain the oil by setting your oil drain pan under the bike and removing the drain plug in your oil pan. You will get your hands dirty, but that’s all part of it, change your crush washer at this time. Next find your oil filter and remove it, there are special tools for this sometimes, but normally with a little ingenuity you can remove it with some elbow grease. Throw in the new fliter and make sure it’s TIGHT (don’t use tools for this). Put your drain plug back in the oil pan and make sure the crush washer is crushed so you don’t leak.

Now it’s time for sparkling, clean new oil; use the filter and after reading your manual, fill your bike with the appropriate amount of oil. Check your oil level and hit the road!

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